Lake Morena’s launch ramp will reopen on April 1st

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  • This Winter’s rain storms have rescued another reservoir’s boat ramp, as water levels have risen enough to again allow private boat launches at Lake Morena beginning on April 1st.

    The lake’s two boat ramps have been out of service due to low water since January of 2014, when city of San Diego Interim Mayor Todd Gloria made the boneheaded decision to draft an already low (12.8% capacity/105.76 feet) Lake Morena an additional 23 vertical feet – leaving the fishery paralyzed at less than 4% capacity.

    Due to evaporation loss, which averages 60″ per year at Lake Morena, and the prolonged drought, the lake would eventually fall to just 2.0% capacity in November, a gauge level of 74.9 feet.

    But the two big rain storms this year have restored Morena a bit, but not quite to the level it was prior to the mayor’s despicable move. It currently sits at 99.9 feet or 9.3% capacity.

    Those additional 25 vertical feet of water since December have made it so the county of San Diego, which operates recreation at Lake Morena will be able to reopen the low water launch ramp, becoming the second local reservoir (Sutherland opened for boat launches this month) to see their launch ramps accessible again this year.

    NOTE: All vessels must pass a Quagga Inspection prior to entering the water. Boats must be COMPLETELY clean and dry. If your boat contains debris, dirt, or is wet it will NOT be allowed to launch.

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  • For now at least, it appears the city of San Diego intends to keep their hands off the water in Lake Morena. Though Morena’ sole purpose in the city’s water infrastructure is to catch and collect runoff for it to be sent downstream to Lower Otay, the lake level still falls below the level which must be kept to satisfy emergency storage levels for the area.

    When Interim Mayor Gloria decided to cripple Lake Morena, it was under emergency conditions that no longer exist. So for now, the water is safe – but we’ll need more to offset this year’s evaporation and keep the ramp operational for future seasons.

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    15 Comments

    1. Man in the early 1980’s you couldn’t keep 3 to 5 pounders off the blade. Rock pile by the primitive camp site was crawdad death zone! Old days in the primitive camp would just pull the boat up to camp site. Fish all day in the back side. Nothing but weeds and trees now

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