662 pound marlin caught in San Diego; largest in last 84 years

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  • 2015 will go down as one of the great sportfishing years in San Diego history, and the hits just keep on coming. Matt Santora and Andy Vo made the catch of the year, perhaps catch of the century today – a 662.2 pound blue marlin.

    The magnificent blue marlin is thought to be the largest marlin caught in California since 1931. Santora and Vo weighed the fish on the certified scale at The Marlin Club of San Diego on Shelter Island.

    In The Marlin Club’s database of historic catches, this one will land at the very top. Previous to this, the largest fish recorded by The Marlin Club was a 390.5 pound swordfish caught in August of 1980. The state record for blue marlin was caught in August of 1931 and weighed 692 pounds, weighed at the Balboa Angling Club in Orange County. The largest fish ever caught and weighed in California was a 1,098.75 pound shortfin mako shark in 2010.

    Santora and Vo were trolling for marlin with the green jig in the photo, aboard Santora’s 21′ boat. Santora fought the fish while Vo captained the boat, eventually landing the fish after a 2 hour battle mid-morning. It was reportedly hooked within 10 miles of San Diego Bay.

    Santora is the owner of the local saltwater angler apparel line, Finbomb.

    Also see other incredible fish stories of 2015

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    31 Comments

    1. They should have released that fish. Just a couple more dudes with overinflated egos and no respect for the fishery. When the State shuts us all down you can thank guys like these.

    2. A fish that size would take n extended time to land, chances are the fish might perish after being released. Blue Marlin unlike striped Marlin is exceptional table fare.

    3. It’s not 1931 anymore and there aren’t many fish like that one left in the ocean. It’s a prime breeder. If we continue to kill them there will be no marlin left in the oceans. Removing apex predators from the ecosystem has a negative ripple effect all the way down the food chain. But don’t trust me; ask the marine biologists at Scrips, NOAA and the U.S. fish and Wildlife Service.

    4. WOW! Congrats to the new recordholders! If I may, I would like to contribute to the Marlin Club’s record with this photo. On 8/21/55, Frank Naso hooked this 406.5 lb marlin. When the fish sounded and took all of the line on Frank’s reel, my grandfather, Felix Budzilko tied his rod and reel onto Frank’s and threw Frank’s into the water. Frank thought he lost the fish plus rod and reel, but it was grandfather’s quick thinking that got Frank his fish. Thanks for letting me share!

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