clear coat or dip for sealing airbrush on soft plastics?

Discussion in 'Lure Making & Customizing' started by Nute, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. Nute

    Nute Researcher...
    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    2,627
    Trophy Points:
    285
    Location:
    Lakeside
    Ratings:
    +3,462
    I can't find the method to properly 'clear coat' my soft baits after airbrushing to seal the paint. Flukes, bigger SB's, and such. Does anyone recommend a spray or preferably a dip?
     
  2. fisheromen

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Messages:
    12,969
    Trophy Points:
    330
    Location:
    Ramona
    Ratings:
    +18,448
    Boat:
    1986 Glastron
    I don't think I would try it on anything expensive, but there's that stuff they advertise on TV that seals "anything".
     
  3. Nute

    Nute Researcher...
    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    2,627
    Trophy Points:
    285
    Location:
    Lakeside
    Ratings:
    +3,462
    Yea.......Im more looking in the lines of an actual bait product. Looks like there's not too many guys one here anymore that do that sort of thing. Too bad.
     
  4. Low&Slow

    Low&Slow Hate us cuz they anus..
    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2015
    Messages:
    611
    Trophy Points:
    160
    Ratings:
    +456
    Try tackleuniverse they have everything on there for bait making and such. Its a little hard to navigate at first but im sure you will find what your looking for
     
  5. Patch Ellis

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2013
    Messages:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    125
    Ratings:
    +396

    The clear coat part is at the end
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
    • List
  6. bajacamp

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Messages:
    821
    Trophy Points:
    200
    Ratings:
    +626
    Copics markers are a clean and quick. I've used them on wood and hard plastic....Helpful video......
     
  7. Fomen

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,646
    Trophy Points:
    195
    Ratings:
    +2,914
    When you say "soft baits", are you referring to swimbaits made out of plastisol? People tend to find their niche and favorite ways of coloring their soft plastics. For detailed coloring jobs, I like to use Alumidust from Alumilite Corp. It comes in over 20 colors, and it can be brushed onto your soft plastics after you pull them out of the molds. But regardless of what coloring system you use, there's a fool proof way of permanently sealing the color into your soft plastics:

    Once you've colored your plastic to it's desired pattern, take some virgin platisol and heat it to cure temp. Don't add anything to it. Keep it water clear. Then grab your swimbait by a tiny corner of the tail or the main body, and quickly dip it down into the hot plastisol. Let the excess drip off. This will apply a paper thin layer of clear plastic over your colorant, and it will NEVER rub off or fade out. It solidifies almost instantly. But if you wanted to expedite the process, take a can of compressed air, hold it upside down (so the refrigerant/propellant comes out), and spray some -100 degree substance on it to instantly cool it down.
     
  8. Fomen

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,646
    Trophy Points:
    195
    Ratings:
    +2,914
    Forgot to add, it you're concerned about diminishing the action of your swimbait by the additional coating, don't be. If you use a super soft plastisol for the final top coat, the layer is so thin, and the material is so soft that the negative impact on the action of the lure is negligible. The only time it would negatively impact performance would be if you intentionally dimpled or added recesses to your lure to hold fish attractant. It will definitely fill in the dimples and recesses. But it will lock in the color and bond at a molecular level with the original plastisol.
     
  9. Nute

    Nute Researcher...
    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    2,627
    Trophy Points:
    285
    Location:
    Lakeside
    Ratings:
    +3,462
    Thank you for the responses! Ill be painting Hudds, and some flukes to start.
     
  10. Fomen

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,646
    Trophy Points:
    195
    Ratings:
    +2,914
    If you're painting hard baits, I recommend a product called AlumiUV from Alumilite Corp. It's a UV cured casting resin. It stays liquid until it gets exposed to UV light. I actually have a fluorescent light fixture at home with 2, 48" UV blacklights that fall into the required light frequency for curing the product. But sunlight works just as good. The product will cure to a water clear, ROCK HARD state in less than 3 minutes. If you warm up the product first, it will get very thin and it can be easily brushed onto your lure. Or you can actually dip your lure into it and let the excess drip off. Then cure it with a UV light source.

    Don't buy UV cured polyester casting resin. You will see that the UV cured polyester resin is 1/2 the price of the AlumiUV product. There's a reason. It's inferior! The fumes it emits are TOXIC, and it eventually yellows. The AlumiUV is more durable, it has no toxic fumes, and it NEVER yellows.

    http://www.alumilite.com/store/p/1027-Alumi-UV.aspx
     
  11. Nute

    Nute Researcher...
    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    2,627
    Trophy Points:
    285
    Location:
    Lakeside
    Ratings:
    +3,462
    For my hardbaits I used to use Dev2ton epoxy and brush it on. Great product, but too thick for my preference. Now, Im using a product by KBS called diamond coat. Its available in liquid or aerosol. Ive tried the spray, and Ill continue to use this product. Extremely irritating vapors but after its curing process (48 hours) the smell goes away. Great product.
     
  12. Fomen

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,646
    Trophy Points:
    195
    Ratings:
    +2,914
    Beauty of AlumiUV is the warmer it gets, the less viscous it gets. If you heat it to about 130 degrees, it will be as thin as water. Then you can dip your lure into it, let the excess drip off, and walk it out into the sun for 2.5 to 3 minutes. The UV rays from the sun will cure it as hard as a rock! The can the AlumiUV comes in is like a paint can, so no light can penetrate and cure it inside the can. As far as I know, it has an indefinite shelf life. I spoke with Larry Dahlberg about it in the Mekelure.com message forum and he said he's been using the same brush for over a year, because it just absolutely will cot cure unless it's exposed to UV. You do not need an expensive UV light set up for what you want to do. The sun will work fine. And UV light rays penetrate through the clouds. So even if it's a cloudy day, you're golden. Not sure if you watched the video link I sent you, but Mike from Alumilite dips a crankbait into the AlumiUV, cures it, takes it outside, and chucks it into the ground 2 or 3 times before any damage is even evident. It's an AMAZING product.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - clear coat sealing Forum Date
Clear coat chipping off. Rod Building & Repair Apr 19, 2016
Okuma clearance Fishing Tackle Oct 4, 2019
Walmart clearance garden area General Fishing Sep 5, 2019
Some Clear Lake action *Video* Bass Aug 30, 2019
Tackle Warehouse Clearance Hot Deals Jul 23, 2019

Share This Page