early spawn

Discussion in 'Freshwater' started by wing man, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. wing man

    wing man Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone else realized that some of the bass that we have been catching (or at least I have:) in our sandiego lakes have egg filled bellies? And I also notice that the males are all lit up? Tt is just that I think its a bit early for them to be in a pre spawn mode, don't ya think? Not that I care, i like spawn fishing.
     
  2. Paul the Great

    Paul the Great Well-Known Member

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    Wingman, thats a nice observation.

    In our san diego lakes, we have many different elevations and types of waters. While one lake may have what appears to be spawning females, I dont think they are fertile untill the sun stays out longer and the water gets warmer. The winter always have the fattest bass. I have tried to teach people that a basses fat stores weigh more than her belly full of eggs. Fat is denser than eggs for the same space. Some people argue this, but its a fact. a cubic inch of fat wieghs more than a cubic inch of eggs. Look it up.

    I dont know what you mean by the males are all lit up. I assume you mean aggresive and willing to strike? Or that their colors change? Watch a bass in a tank, he will change instantly. His colors change with his mood or location in seconds. Their eyes can change in a matter of seconds, also. From red, to bronze, to yellowish, to black. As can their scales. Year round, every day, there are bass in 3 to 7 feet of water that can be caught. At some time during the day, even in the winter on a blue bird day while its cold and windy, these fish, some of them cruise shallow.

    Some waters like Sutherland and then cuyamaca and morena will have a later spawn due to temps, while barrett and otay could go off first. Hodges is a good gauge of what a regular lake is doing. Hodges is always good. But there is a definate spawn bite.

    I fish a pond whos water is the same temp year round, no matter what. Even with 70 degree water, the bass still wait till the 3rd or 4th moon of the year to move up and dump eggs. This last about a month. A third of all basses in any water will spawn within a few weeks. Another third will spawn late, and a third doesnt ever spawn. Too young or too old.

    One of the best lakes in the winter is Loveland. One of the worst is Wohlford. Then they flip, the water turns over and spring at wohlford turns on, and loveland goes flat.

    All females always have eggs, some are very tiny, smaller than sand, but they are always there. They have the same number of eggs when they are born, and die with the same capacity to carry the same exact number of eggs when they die. Just like a turkey and most birds have so many eggs when they are born, thats what they hatch. Same with bass.

    Same as human cells. A baby is born with the same amount of fat cells as when it dies, same with muscle cells, and many others.

    Wild fish are amazing, and some taste good, too!
     
  3. Roy Justice

    Roy Justice Original Member
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    this is prespawn in san diego, we are much warmer here than minnesota
     
  4. wing man

    wing man Well-Known Member

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    thanks paulfishes,
    what i meant about the male bass being all lit up is that they seem to be very brightly colored, like they are when you catch them on there beds. by the way im talking about the bass at Loveland.
     
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