fly line choice for boat fishing 8-14ft

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing' started by captwoody, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. captwoody

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    Name:
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    when fishing the shallows of San Diego bay in a boat is floating or sinking/sink tip better. in the tube sinking/sink tip works way better because you are kicking. but in boat its harder to control speed. I am averaging way more fish in a tube than in a boat so I am guessing my boat presentation is lacking.
     
  2. CraigSmith

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    In 8-15 feet of water:

    1. Intermediate line for slow current and no wind will work in 4-10 feet of water. At the deeper end of this range you will need to be patient and let the line sink.

    2. Sinking or sink tip (24-30ft) with 3-4 ips sink rates with a breeze and/or faster current.

    3. Sinking or sink tip (24-30 ft) with 5-7 ips sink rate for stronger breeze and/or faster current.

    4. Sinking or sink tip line (24-30ft) with 7-9 ips sink rate for fastest wind/current drifts and deepest water (>15 ft)

    I almost always have the first 3 rigs above with me when fishing from a boat.

    Floating line in less than 3-4 ft of water, maybe 5-6 feet if it is dead calm and a slow current. I sometimes carry a floating rig with me to using with an indicator or to fish topwater.

    When at all possible, try to retrieve the same direction the water current is moving, or as close to it as possible.

    It is not unusual for anglers at different ends of the boat to have different levels of success when using the exact same rigs. Sometimes widely different. When this occurs it usually has to do with how their fly is moving with respect to the direction of the current. Even if the direction of the cast is the same for both anglers, the way the boat drifts in the wind can affect presentation and each end of the boat. Some boats drift broad side, some bow first, some even stern first, though the latter is less common.

    When you are in a float tube you have less sail area so impacted by the wind less and you can also use your legs to hold position, move slower, or easily reorient with respect to the wind. Since you are less affected by the wind you are more likely to move along with the current rather than cross ways to it. These benefits often allow you to keep in position to catch a lot of fish in a short period of time.

    It will really help to have a drogue or drift sock for your boat once the wind speed gets above 5mph. A drift sock will often cut your wind drift speed by more than half.. Deploying a drogue to slow down wind drift (it has no effect on current drift unless the wind is blowing opposite current direction) can often mean the difference between getting no grabs and catching a couple of dozen fish. Really. I don't have a boat but I have a drift sock that I use on rental skiffs. Back in the 1990's my catch rates went way up on breezy days when I started using a drift sock. A bow mounted electric motor with GPS and spot lock and the ability to set a course can also be very useful. A drift sock costs a lot less though. If you use a drift sock, don't get locked in to always tying it off at the same place. Depending on how your boat drifts and how many anglers there are on board you may want to have it connect toward the stern, toward the bow, or amidship. Don't forget you have a drift sock deployed. It gets ugly if it gets caught in a prop.

    Over time you will find that, on average, you will catch more fish from a boat than a float tube, provided you use the boat's advantages, primary of which is the ability to cover water and the ability to get to places you can't get to or fish effectively from a tube. You can also fish in current, weather, and wind conditions that you cannot work well in a tube unless you have bionic legs. A kayak falls in between. A pontoon with oars falls between a kayak and a float tube.

    However there are some situations and conditions where the float tube's benefits can put you in a position to be more successful than a boat angler. And float tubes are cheaper and easier to maintain and store.
     
    #2 CraigSmith, Aug 26, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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  3. captwoody

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    Thanks for the pointers Craig I have 2 drift socks so I will bring one when I go in others boats
     
  4. CraigSmith

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    Also, when fishing in a boat the ability to make a long cast can be really beneficial. Sometimes a long cast can be detrimental too.

    Two examples that involve fishing the wide grass flats of south San Diego Bay.:

    1). Late morning or afternoon with the prevailing westerly or north westerly wind and an out going current. If the breeze gets to 7-8 mph or so you will get pushed against the current. Here it helps to be able to make a very long cast ( 80+ feet wind aided of course). You make a long cast and start stripping quickly as soon as the fly hits the water. But the the wind is somewhat against the current so the fly itself is not moving very fast relative to the bottom. You have to strip fast to keep a tight line. If you only cast 40 feet you will quickly drift over the fly.

    2) Late morning or afternoon with the prevailing westerly or north westerly wind and an incoming current. If the breeze gets to 7-8 mph or so you will get pushed with the current and drift pretty fast relative to the bottom. Here if you make a very long cast into the wind the line will come tight quickly and your fly may never get near the bottom even with a fast sinking line. Instead you make a shorter 30-50 ft cast and then flick out some extra slack so the fly and the line are not tight to your rod tip and they sink best. Let the line pay out then start a slow retrieve.

    I can think of about another 6-10 variations and probably more. Just taking these two situations and cutting the breeze in half may necessitate a change in presentation. Play around with different length casts in different conditions based on wind direction, depth, current speed, and angle of the cast relative to those parameters.

    The ability to make long casts will put you into more fish. But sometimes shorter casts are better. I could describe a lot of the situations but it the optimal presentations for combinations of wind, current, depth are best learned on the water where you can experiment.
     
    #4 CraigSmith, Aug 26, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2019
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