Is it legal to use lobster nets off of a jetty?

Discussion in 'Lobster Fishing' started by steven mirasol, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. steven mirasol

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    Is it even possible?
     
  2. Nute

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    I've seen em in quivera jetty all the time.


    Jah
     
  3. steven mirasol

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    do you think using a lobster net off of the jetty in mission beach a good spot for lobsters?
     
  4. Chris k

    Chris k Walking Encyclopedia
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    Not at all I would not eat ANY bottom feeder from mission bay because all the pollutants are on the bottom and are built up in lobster,crab , and croaker meat so don't, go to any where else
     
  5. Nute

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    Fair enough, but why are there a ton of guys hooping all over MB?


    Jah
     
  6. STiCKY

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    Lol cause rednecks eat rodents lol!
     
  7. Chris k

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    Because they are uneducated toxins are building up in thier bodies
     
  8. Nute

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    Cool. So, can you show me the data to back that up? Specifically bay lobsters being toxic? Not trolling you. I'm interested.


    Jah
     
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  9. Chris k

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    UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- Researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are using bullheads -- a type of catfish -- as an indicator of the levels of the pollutant dioxin in Lake Erie's Presque Isle Bay.

    "About five to 10 years ago, people fishing in Lake Erie began to report catching bullheads with tumors on their mouths and skin," explains Daniel Weinstock, senior research associate in Penn State's Animal Diagnostic Laboratory. "Cornell University did the initial evaluations of why these fish showed tumors, followed by a second evaluation by Pennsylvania's Department of Agriculture. Now, Penn State, doing a third evaluation, used molecular detective work to establish bullheads as an animal that can be used to monitor the contamination levels of toxic compounds over time."

    Sponsored by a 1997 grant from Pennsylvania's Department of Environmental Protection, Penn State's research team focused on determining levels of dioxin, an environmental contaminant produced in minuscule amounts as byproducts of industrial processing and combustion. The project was spearheaded by Eric Obert, associate director of the Sea Grant program at Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

    The term dioxin describes a family of 75 related chemical compounds that are extremely toxic. The jungle defoliant Agent Orange, used extensively during the Vietnan War, contained dioxins. The pollutants found in the Love Canal environmental crisis also were dioxin compounds. Almost every human being carries traces of dioxin in their fatty tissue, and quantities can build up over time because dioxins, with a half-life of 12 years, break down very slowly within the body.

    Bullheads were chosen as the species to observe and monitor for pollutant levels because they are bottom-feeding fish, and dioxin compounds tend to settle into the sediments at the bottom of bodies of water.

    Weinstock, Tom Drake and Arthur Hattel, all veterinary pathologists at Penn State's Animal Diagnostic Lab, evaluated 100 fish for evidence of tumors caused by exposure to dioxin. Sixteen tissues from each fish were examined microscopically. "Traditional toxicology studies use laboratory rodents with controlled exposure to toxicants to assess the harmful effects of that substance," Weinstock explains. "The novelty of this approach is the evaluation of a wild population of fish to gauge levels of environmental pollution."

    Previous studies of Presque Isle Bay bullheads showed a high incidence of skin and mouth tumors. The Penn State study showed the number of tumors had drastically decreased. "The big question is why," Weinstock says.

    In order to fathom how dioxin might be affecting Presque Isle bullhead populations, the research team compared levels of dioxin in bile in the liver of fish -- with and without tumors -- with the levels of dioxin found in sediments at each collection site.

    Jack Vanden Heuvel, assistant professor of veterinary science and a molecular toxicologist, used genetic research techniques to determine the dioxin levels within the sediments at each collection site in Presque Isle Bay as well as Eaton Reservoir, a nearby collection site away from Lake Erie. He started by developing a test that would allow researchers to "see" whether fish tissues contained dioxin.

    "I combine luciferase, the enzyme that makes fireflies' bodies glow with genetic material that interacts genetically with dioxin molecules," Vanden Heuvel explains. "The higher the levels of dioxin, the more light is emitted."

    Vanden Heuvel is using even more sophisticated cellular sleuthing to determine if the incidence of tumors in Presque Isle bullhead have been reduced over time. "We didn't see as many tumors in the last sample collection," Vanden Heuvel says. "We don't know if the reason is fresh sedimentation covering up dioxin-laden sediments, remediation efforts in the bay, or evolution. Since the levels of dioxin are still quite high, I suspect the reason for decreased tumors is natural selection."

    In the coming year Vanden Heuvel will use a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to identify the unique genetic material in bullhead that is activated by interaction with dioxin compounds. Using this "genetic fingerprint" for dioxin, Vanden Heuvel can trace dioxin levels not only for bullheads collected for the Penn State research project, but also for fish samples collected previously.

    "The PCR test allows you to set up an experiment in evolution," Vanden Heuvel explains. "If we examine samples collected 10 years ago and move toward the present day, we can get an idea of how dioxin levels have affected this environment. For example, if I test more recently collected samples and see fish whose genetic material is not affected by dioxin, then that suggests the bullhead population is genetically adapting through natural selection in order to survive in that environment."

    Vanden Heuvel says the same genetic detective work also is adaptable for other pollutants. "You can pick a gene that is activated by metals such as cadmium or mercury, or even a particular herbicide," he says.

    He also points out that the tests are easily adapted to other fish species. "We had to design all new testing procedures because bullheads are not normal laboratory test animals, nor are they related to other test animals," he says. "Now scientists can use these same techniques to gauge pollutant levels in any type of fish, from trout to bluegills. All you have to do is go out and catch them." In conclusion bottom feeders are able to build up more toxic levels in thier bodies because all the pollution that has been in fish that have died and pollution just laying on the ground goes into lobsters and croaker makeing the meat unsafe (if consumed on a regular basis)
     
  10. Nute

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    Right on. You just made me read an article that had absolutely nothing to do with mission bay, or sd bay......or any bay on the west coast. Don't get me wrong, I'm sure our bays are far from pristine.

    Furthermore, nice job on the snatch and grab from the Internet. That study was specifically focused on Erie and northern bays. In that case, you're 100% correct.


    Jah
     
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  11. Chris k

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    Same principle plus when my father was in the navy he told me that they just dump everything into the bay plus with the river coming from tj that's pretty gross but hey
     
  12. Chris k

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    Also over the years it has been cleaned up by the navy so I could be wrong but it does take a long time for pollutants to dissipate
     
  13. Titos334

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    Same principle but different application and the TJ river doesn't go into either bay.
     
  14. StinkyPinky

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    Don't have any links but there were studies done on fish from inside sd bay and in the kelp outside the bay. The fish in the kelp had higher mercury levels than the bay fish. But hey, make sure you NEVER eat anything from the bay it's gross. I believe this info was previously posted in this site
     
  15. 1fishnfool

    1fishnfool Well-Known Member

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    I have caught hundreds of lobster in sd bay over the last years,and I feel i am perfectly normal,my kids are fine,but my dog,who I give the shells to,has started barking in spanish,so maybe there is something to this.
     
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  16. Saltandlead

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    Everytime I float tube SD Bay, people tell me not to eat anything out of it. There's no research showing that these fish have higher levels of "toxins" and plenty of people eat them without any ill effects. I don't believe that the bays are dirty enough to poison someone or introduce any level of toxins higher than in normal fish. Hell, the yellows offshore this season were worse than the fish in the bay. Full of parasites.

    Sent from my HTC6500LVW using Tapatalk
     
  17. Lawman

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    Skip the meat hunt. Evolve and develop yourself as a highly skilled angler. Lobster fishing is for losers. Minimal skill involved. So Boring. I have better things to do.
     
  18. Sheepdog8404

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    I agree that there is probably very little skill involved with lobster fishing... However, Lobster tastes amazing, and the fact that one can go out and harvest their own lobster for dinner rather than going to a restaurant and paying $30 for a plate with a small one is very appealing. I'm sure there are very few people who do it because its exhilarating, but that's not really what it's about, is it?

    So does anyone have any advice for OPs initial question regarding the legality of hoop netting off a jetty?
     
  19. Medicated fisherman

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    It's perfectly legal but nearly impossible if not in a boat.
     
  20. Lawman

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    To sheepdog: A Ribeye steak from Costco is spectacular. Its easy to get. No boat required. No gear required. No license required. I don't get cold doing it. Most importantly, I don't have to reduce myself to a neanderthal meat hunter to buy one. If I want a lobster, I earn enough money to buy a Maine Lobster at a restaurant in the company of a beautiful women.
     
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