New to tubing the lakes (and I am a flyfisherman)

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing' started by BILL NELSON, May 31, 2020.

  1. BILL NELSON

    BILL NELSON Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Ratings:
    +92
    Looking for some general tips /do's and don'ts/to get me started
    Any info helps
    I tube the bays all the time, but thought I should start looking at the lakes too
    Thanks
     
  2. bassgalrascal

    Staff Member SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,494
    Trophy Points:
    285
    Location:
    North San Diego County
    Ratings:
    +2,865
    Not sure what you want to know about. Float tubing on lakes would just be like any other type of floating vessel, except of course that you have to kick around to get anywhere. It helps to know what the bottom contours and depths are, so you will know how to target the fish. I usually have a little inexpensive Chinese handheld sonar unit with me when I float tube. You can either clip the wireless transducer to a little monofilament leash to your float tube, or you can bring a spinning or casting rig with you and cast the transducer out towards where you want to fish, to tell you what's out there. That way you will cover more productive water.
     
  3. BILL NELSON

    BILL NELSON Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Ratings:
    +92
    Thank you - that's a good start
     
  4. CraigSmith

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    1,070
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Ratings:
    +2,587
    Don't need to rinse your gear to protect from saltwater corrosion. But you should wipe down floating flylines after the day since most of our local lakes have suspended sediments, algae, and other material that will affect floatability and shootability over time. Sometimes even over the course of the day.

    Some lakes require inspection before launching a tube (Cuyamaca, Morena for example) so it doesn't hurt to rinse the bottom off with a good brushing before any crud pickup from from lunching and exiting dries on hard. Same for you fins and booties or boots.

    A floating line and a 10-12 foot sink tip will cover most local lake fly fishing situations. But I also use intermediate lines and fast sinking integrated shooting tapers that I use in the bay for some situations.

    I like to carry two to three rigged rods. The solution I have is unfortunately a product that is no longer available (Dan Blanton's Rigged 'n Ready Rod Bags). You can strap extra rods to the side of a tube.

    You could just carry extra spools. Or go with a single rod and reel (no extra spool) solution by using a line system like Rio's Versitip Lines. They run about $180 and have 15 foot floating, intermediate, and a 3ips and 6ips tips. (needs to be the version for single handed rods, not two handed rods). Cheaper than buying 4 fly lines. But you already have lines for the salt that will work in the lakes in some situations.

    You will be making mostly shorter distance casts from a float tube. To help load the rod better consider going up one or two line sizes, maybe even three if bass fishing. When bass and bluegill fishing a lot of time I'm only 30 ft from may target so the rod won't load optimally with 10-15 feet of line out. If you are 30ft from you target, 8 or 9 ft is taken up by the rod, 6 to 9 with the leader and that only leaves 10-15 ft of fly line.

    When bass fishing from a tube I usually use a 6wt rod loaded with a WF-8-F line and an 8 wt rod with a WF-10-F line. These will allow me to cast streamers, poppers, and weight flies along with buggers and such. The 6wt with the 8wt floating line will also put bluegill poppers right where I want them easily.

    As you fish farther into the day, as the sun gets higher, the fish will go deeper. That is where the sinking lines come into play. Bass and bluegill will often retreat deeper into shallow cover (brush, reeds) and you won't be able to get to them very well with fly gear. Just part of the game.

    Have some sort of anchoring device (a mesh bag you can fill with rocks works on many bottoms) for when you find that rockpile covered with hungry bass.

    Consider pushing short lengths of cable ties up through the bottom of the apron to help keep loops of loose fly line from tangling. Or get some cheap lightweight material and do the same and attach it to the top your apron (sticky backed velcro works).

    A sonar unit is helpful but don't become overly reliant on them. Most units that work well on a tube have a narrow down looking cone. You can be in an area loaded with fish and not see any on a finder. I use mine mostly for checking depths. Usually after a few trips to a lake I don't bother with the finder unless I plan to hit up a different section. You can make some pretty good guesses about what the bottom may look like by looking at the shore line.

    Most important thing though is to learn about the behavior of your target species and how they behave a different times of the year in the waters you will fish. Read a lot and keep notes. Watch what others are doing, even non-fly anglers.

    Learn how to make curve casts if you don't already know. If you can through line that lands in a curve you can cast around things or even cast a line that lands almost in an "L" shape the lays the leader and part of the end of the fly line parallel to shore structure. Then part of your retrieve will move along the structure rather than away from it immediately.

    Have a net. It helps for dealing with pokey things like catfish and bullhead, and difficult to grasp fishies like carp. Despite my recommendation, I rarely carry one though unless I am fishing a lake that is known to have big trout.
     
    #4 CraigSmith, May 31, 2020
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  5. BILL NELSON

    BILL NELSON Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Ratings:
    +92
    That's a lot of good advice thank both
    I usually carry 2 6 weights in the bay - I vary between int, sinking, and floating depending on where, depth, tide, etc - fresh I have a 5 with 3 spools, a 6 with 2 spools, and the same with the 8 -
    What lake would be a good starting lake in your opinion?
     
  6. CraigSmith

    SDFish VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    1,070
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Ratings:
    +2,587
    Otay for bass/bluegill

    Cuyamaca for Trout. Check Cuyamaca's website for trout stock info. As the water warms up during the summer stocks will be on old until the fall. You can wade Cuyamaca too. If trouting at Cuyamaca you can often take the lazy approach and let out 50 ft of line and just slowly troll along with a black, olive, or brown wooly bugger or matuka. I will often add a trailing hare's ear, prince nymph, or zug bug. This combo imitates both damselfly and dragonfly larvae. Very relaxing.

    Unfortunately Sutherland and Barrett won't be opening this year.


    You will have to adapt your tactics during the year as water levels rise and fall and weed/acquatic grass grows in and dies off.
     
    #6 CraigSmith, May 31, 2020
    Last edited: May 31, 2020
  7. BILL NELSON

    BILL NELSON Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2016
    Messages:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Ratings:
    +92
    Thank you for the advice
     
Loading...
Similar Threads - tubing lakes (and Forum Date
Tubing lakes Freshwater May 24, 2015
Best Tubing lakes Freshwater Nov 13, 2014
Tubing at Otay Freshwater May 31, 2020
Tubing tomorrow where to go Bay Fishing May 26, 2020
Float Tubing the Bay Bay Fishing May 8, 2020

Share This Page