Question for San Elijo and San Clemente

Discussion in 'Surf, Piers, & Jetties' started by Fuzztone, May 3, 2009.

  1. Fuzztone

    Fuzztone Well-Known Member

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    In June I'm taking my boys to camp at San Elijo and San Clemente. We would like to surf fish while there.
    Is June/July a good time for fishing the surf, or, is there too much seaweed?
    Some friends said they caught small sharks, and a guitar fish using sandcrabs while there. Is that the local species?
    I have already purchassed the requisite MORF's and "crack". And I am well versed in dropshotting and jigging with leadheads in the bay. Will these work in the surf?
    Any info would be great...

    Fuzztone
     
  2. krucz36

    krucz36 Active Member

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    I've always used a sliding egg sinker rig at whatever weight works with the surf + 18" or more of leader and a piece of gulp. works well for barred surf perch, walleyes and corbina. sand crabs will catch leopards, guitarfish, smooth hound shark, and croaker, as well as bines and perch. personally i like to cast and move.
    one fun thing you can do with the kiddos if you don't feel like hiking all over the beach is to hook up a hand-sized perch on a slider, then have one of them paddle it out past the surf on a surfboard or boogieboard and drop it. You can get some nice shark like that.
     
  3. Fuzztone

    Fuzztone Well-Known Member

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    Cool...Sounds like carolina rig. It's good to know.
    The boogie board idea sounds fun too, thanks.
     
  4. ol dirty basser

    SDFish VIP

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    The same species are found more or less throughout the sandy beaches of SoCal. At either beach, expect to catch perch, yellowfin and possibly spotfin croaker, corbina, halibut, and maybe guitarfish or leopard sharks, especially if you target them. Pretty much the same from IB to LA County, although some beaches are better for certain species.

    As far as summer and seaweed, I don't think there's a connection. I actually think seaweed is more of a problem in the spring because the swell is more consistent at that time. Often in the summer the swell is small and the water is clear. You might not get as big of perch in the summer, but your chances of catching a corbina are much better.

    I love the summer for surf fishin'.
     
  5. ol dirty basser

    SDFish VIP

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    Oh yeah, dropshotting can work in the surf sometimes, but it is much harder if there is much swell. Usually if you are dropshotting the surf it's for halibut, in which case a jerkbait or spoon (Kroc or Kastmaster) might be nice to cover more water. But then again, if you put that dropshot in front of a hali he's gonna eat it. I'm sure the YFCs will suck it up as well, they do in the bay.
     
  6. Fuzztone

    Fuzztone Well-Known Member

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    Great info ODB...Thanks! I can't wait to try the surf out.
    Any recommendations on line size? We have 15# preloaded on our 8' rods we bought. I know it's tough to say without knowing what our target species is. Our target is anything that will bite and pull!
    I doubt we will be able to get past the breakers at all.
     
  7. ol dirty basser

    SDFish VIP

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    There are three basic ways to attack the surf. The first is to go light. This is one of the more popular ways to surf fish. 4 or 6# is ideal, on a long (7' or better) rod if you have one. This is what you use to fish the crack or MORF, and also sandcrabs or ghost shrimp. You DO NOT always have to cast far, oftentimes you will get bit in knee-deep water or less. This is ideal if you are fishing for perch and corbina, although you never know what it will get you.

    The second way is to fish 6-12# with lures. This is probably one of the least common tactics IMO. Jerkbaits (Lucky Craft 110 flash minnows are popular), spoons (Krocodiles or Kastmasters) small swimbaits and dropshot fit into this category. You will be primarily targeting halibut like this, although you could also hook up with other random fish (especially yellowfin croakers) on occasion. In general, longer rods are better for all types of surf fishing.

    The last way to go about it is to use big rods for big fish. It's basic bait and wait, usually trying to get out as far as possible. Do this if you're trying for sharks and rays. You could get a big leopard this way. Sliding sinker rig, 2-4 oz of weight, and 15-30# line are standard. Smaller hooks and baits might also help you get spotfin and yellowfin croaker when they're further out.

    Of course there are an infinite number of variations in between, but these are what I commonly see. You could also add in fly fishing, which runs semi-parallel to the first option, but with fly gear. Don't be afraid to experiment. If you don't have the exact gear you need, use the closest thing you have.

    Good luck. Best thing about surf fishing is that if you don't catch much, you still spent the day at the beach. Not a bad deal.

    P.S., I just noticed you said you bought 8' 15# class rods. Use those for chucking big bait, but also bring along some small freshwater rods if you got 'em. That's usually the most fun and productive way to catch fish in the surf.
     
  8. Fuzztone

    Fuzztone Well-Known Member

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    Now that's what I call "helping a brother out"! Lots of great info. I really appreciate it!

    ODB Rocks!
     
  9. krucz36

    krucz36 Active Member

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    awesome info ODB!
    the sandcrabs are just now starting to come in, they should be perfect in a week or two... here come the corbina!
     
  10. GTSCHOLAR619

    GTSCHOLAR619 Well-Known Member

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    man im kind of new to surf fishing myself planning to go to torrey pines this monday. I was wondering when is it really the best time to go surf fishing around what time and when is the target time to go like 2 hours b4 incomming tide and 2 hours after? Or maybe the sun is a factor cause people say around sunrise and sunset and anything between that is worthless. Can you catch all throughout the day or what? I will be having ghost shrimp, real blood worms, and gulp 2'sandworms camo and bloody. I did well with the ghost shrimp and the real blood worm worked well..i cut the worm like around 2' of it. Should i use a whole one to catch a bigger one or should i piece them like i did. didnt have luck with the gulp yet not even a bite but i just started using them it was just a sucky day i guess. I noticed the wind and current have allot to do with it cause i went fishing in mission beach and there was like 4-5 sets of waves and it was too windy not to mention the seaweed everywhere....im starting to feel its not a good time to go surf fishing or im just not in the right place at the right time. Torrey pines is what im planning for monday so any advice would be great..especially for good spots over there.
    thanks.
    glenn
     
  11. krucz36

    krucz36 Active Member

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    as far as the gulp, how are you rigging it? a carolina rig is preferred for those guys with a .5-1.5oz egg slider and bead. a stiffer leader will keep you from getting twisted up in the surf.
    But with that array of baits, you should catch fish. One thing is to search for holes in the beach, areas where the whitewater on the breakers disappears, or the whole wave kind of settles in, is more likely to have a deeper spot in the sand, or some kind of depression that's goin to attract fish and shelter them from the waves. Also look for rips and color changes in the water.
    In the summer corbina can sometimes come all the way up into shallow water so their backs are in the sun. They're really flighty though so you may need to sight-fish them, dropping bait where they're going to be, not where they are, then retreating.
    I generally prefer high tide incoming. Does anyone else have advice on fishing outgoing?
     
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